Universal Everything 

is a UK-based diverse studio at the crossover between design and art. With commissions ranging from packaging to stadium events, for clients from Apple to London 2012 Olympics.

Working with everything from pencils to generative design, Universal Everything is a diverse UK-based studio at the crossover between design and art. With commissions ranging from packaging to stadium events, for clients from Apple to London 2012 Olympics. Their works have shown in galleries from Museum of Modern Art, New York to Colette, Paris.

Motivated by the pursuit of the new, creative research and development are central, leading to self-initiated pieces and unique projects for brands, galleries, collectors and consumers.

 

Founded by creative director Matt Pyke, after 8 years at the internationally renowned studio, The Designers Republic from 1996 - 2004, Universal Everything operates as an evergrowing global network of designers, artists, musicians, producers and programmers.

 

Source: Universal Everything

Universal Everything, london, design

Reading

VJ: Audio-Visual Art + VJ Culture (2006) edited by D-Fuse. A major change has taken place at dance clubs worldwide: the advent of the VJ. Once the term denoted the presenter who introduced music videos on MTV, but now it defines an artist who creates and mixes video, live and in sync to music, whether at dance clubs and raves or art galleries and festivals. This book is an in-depth look at the artists at the forefront of this dynamic audio-visual experience. (Laurence King Publishing)

Audio.Visual - On Visual Music and Related Media (2009) by Cornelia Lund and Holger Lund (Eds.) is divided into two sections: the first deals with the academic discussion on the subject of visual music; the second introduces contemporary paradigms of audio-visual praxis in brief presentations and contextualises them. Apart from being a guide in the historical sense, this new volume provides theoretical approaches to understanding and making visual music. (Fluctuating Images)

Sonic Graphics/Seeing Sound (2000) by Matt Woolman presents exemplary work from studios around the world in three sections: Notation analyses the use of sign and symbol systems in creating identity and branding for music artists, recording projects and performances; Material considers how products can package the intrinsic nature of the music they contain; and Atmosphere looks at how space and multidimensional environmeaants can be used to visualize sound. A reference section includes studio websites and a glossary. (Thames & Hudson)

 

SEE ALSO

Simple Harmonic Motion study #5d (2011) by Mehmet Akten is an ongoing research and series of projects exploring the nature of complex patterns created from the interaction of multilayered rhythms. This version was designed for and shown at Ron Arads Curtain Call at the Roundhouse. This ultra wide video is mapped around the 18m wide, 8m tall cylindrical display made from 5,600 silicon rods, allowing the audience to view from inside and outside. (Mehmet Akten)

Steve Reich: Second Movement (2006) - D-Fuse, in collaboration with director and designer C├ęsar Pesquera performed with the London Symphony Orchestra for Steve Reich's 70th Birthday concert at the Barbican Hall featuring live video mixed to Reich's The Desert Music. (D-Fuse, PDF)

Art That Moves: The Work of Len Lye (2009) by Roger Horrocks, author of the best-selling and critically acclaimed 2001 Len Lye: A biography, shifts the focus from Len Lye's life to his art practice and innovative aesthetic theories about "the art of motion," which continue to be relevant today. Going beyond a general introduction to Len Lye and his artistic importance, this in-depth book offers a detailed study of his aesthetics of motion, analyzing how these theories were embodied in his sculptures and films. (Amazon)

That Track 3D (2004) appears on Hexstatic's 2004 CD/DVD release Master View (ZEN92). This is the anaglyph version. Watch it wearing 3D glasses for the full effect.

Semiconductor make moving image works which reveal our physical world in flux; cities in motion, shifting landscapes and systems in chaos. Since 1999 UK artists Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt have worked with digital animation to transcend the constraints of time, scale and natural forces; they explore the world beyond human experience, questioning our very existence. (FatCat Records)